February 17, 2006  
 

 

SABER Offers FFTB Replacement

By Kelen Tuttle

As SLAC prepares to remove FFTB and construct the LCLS, a dozen or so researchers and engineers are designing the South Arc Beam Experimental Region (SABER). If approved, this new facility will allow the Lab to continue high energy electron beam experiments indefinitely. SLAC is the only place in the world that can provide the high peak current, high energy electron and positron beams that make this type of research possible.

 

The proposed SABER beam would travel along the first two-thirds of the linac before trekking through a bypass transport line and traveling into the instrument section of the SLC South Arc tunnel.
(Image courtesy of C. Joshi, UCLA)

 

"FFTB has accomplished science that was never anticipated when that facility was built," said Roger Erickson, who manages accelerator operations at SLAC. "SABER will allow us to continue this science during and after LCLS construction."

Like FFTB, SABER would have a small focus and pulse compression. Yet unlike the current system, SABER would add the ability to compress bunches of positrons as well as electrons. This will allow for the continuation and expansion of many avenues of research, especially beam-plasma physics.

"SABER would deliver very short, intense bursts of electrons or positrons unlike anything available elsewhere," Erickson continued. "This will be a unique facility."

In order to run in tandem with LCLS, the SABER beam would travel along the first two-thirds of the linac before trekking through a bypass transport line and traveling into the instrument section of the SLC South Arc tunnel. By avoiding the last third of the linac, SABER would run independently of LCLS.

Before construction begins, Erickson and his collaborators must carefully assess safety implications and refine the design details and cost estimates.

"We’re at an exploratory phase right now," said Erickson. "But if all goes well, I would like to start construction of the major components in the next fiscal year."

For documentation on SABER, see: http://www.slac.stanford.edu/grp/rd/epac/Meeting/200601/

The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center is managed by Stanford University for the US Department of Energy

Last update Friday February 17, 2006 by TIP